2021 popular Eminent discount Victorians discount (Classic, 20th-Century, Penguin) sale

2021 popular Eminent discount Victorians discount (Classic, 20th-Century, Penguin) sale

2021 popular Eminent discount Victorians discount (Classic, 20th-Century, Penguin) sale
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A genre-changing work of biography

Eminent Victorians marked an epoch in the art of biography; it also helped to crack the old myths of high Victorianism and to usher in a new spirit by which chauvinism, hypocrisy and the stiff upper lip were debunked. In it, Strachey cleverly exposes the self-seeking ambitions of Cardinal Manning and the manipulative, neurotic Florence Nightingale; and in his essays on Dr Arnold and General Gordon, his quarries are not only his subjects but also the public-school system and the whole structure of nineteenth-century liberal values.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Amazon.com Review

The four biographical essays that make up Eminent Victorians created something of a stir when they were first published in the spring of 1918, bringing their author instant fame. In his flamboyant collection, Lytton Strachey chose to stray far from the traditional mode of biography: "Those two fat volumes, with which it is our custom to commemorate the dead--who does not know them, with their ill-digested masses of material, their slipshod style, their tone of tedious panegyric, their lamentable lack of selection, of detachment, of design?" Instead he provided impressionistic but acute (and, some said, skewed) portraits. Rarely does Strachey explore the details of a subject''s daily or family life unless they point directly to an issue of character. In short, he pioneered a deeply sardonic and often scathingly funny biographical style.

None of Strachey''s Victorians emerge unscathed. In his hands, Florence Nightingale is not a gentle archangel descended from heaven to minister sweetly to wounded soldiers, but rather an exacting, dictatorial, and judgmental crusader. Her "pen, in the virulence of its volubility, would rush ... to the denunciation of an incompetent surgeon or the ridicule of a self-sufficient nurse. Her sarcasm searched the ranks of the officials with the deadly and unsparing precision of a machine-gun. Her nicknames were terrible. She respected no one." Dr. Thomas Arnold, the man appointed to revamp the very private British public school system, fares little better: in Strachey''s acid ink, he became "the founder of the worship of athletics and the worship of good form." In this same vain, military hero General Gordon is portrayed as a temperamental, irascible hermit, occasionally drunk and often found in the company of young boys--a man who tended to forget and forgo the tenets found in the Bible he kept with him always. And the powerful and popular Cardinal Manning, who came within a hair''s breadth of succeeding Pope Pius IX, belonged, Strachey writes, "to that class of eminent ecclesiastics ... who have been distinguished less for saintliness and learning than for practical ability."

As he offered up indelible sketches of his less-than-fab four, Strachey was intent on critiquing established mores. This effortlessly superior wit knew full well that deep convictions and good deeds often go hand in hand with hypocrisy, arrogance, and egomania. His task was to pique those who pretended they did not. --Jordana Moskowitz

Review

Collection of short biographical sketches by Lytton Strachey, published in 1918. Strachey''s portraits of Cardinal Manning, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Arnold, and General Charles "Chinese" Gordon revolutionized English biography. Until Strachey, biographers had kept an awestruck distance from their subjects; anything short of adulation was regarded as disrespect. Strachey, however, announced that he would write lives with "a brevity which excludes everything that is redundant and nothing that is significant," whether flattering to the subject or not. His intensely personal sketches scandalized stuffier readers but delighted many literati. Strachey''s impressionistic portraits occasionally led to inaccuracy, since he selected the facts he liked and had little use for politics or religion. By portraying his "Eminent Victorians" as multifaceted, flawed human beings rather than idols, and by informing public knowledge with private information, Strachey ushered in a new era of biography. --

About the Author

Lytton Strachey, whose iconoclastic reexaminations of historical figures forever changed the course of modern biographical writing, was born in London on March 1, 1880. He was educated in a series of private schools and attended University College, Liverpool, before entering Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1899. In London he found work as an essayist for various journals and became the drama critic for The Spectator. The favorable reception of his first book, Landmarks in French Literature (1912), bolstered his commitment to writing. Virginia Woolf said: "The figure of Lytton Strachey is so important a figure in the history of biography that it compels a pause. For his three famous books, Eminent Victorians, Queen Victoria, and Elizabeth and Essex, are of a stature to show both what biography can do and what biography cannot do. . . . The anger and the interest that his short studies of Eminent Victorians aroused showed that he was able to make Manning, Florence Nightingale, Gordon, and the rest live as they had not lived since they were actually in the flesh. . . . In the lives of the two great Queens, Elizabeth and Victoria, he attempted a far more ambitious task. Biography had never had a fairer chance of showing what it could do. For it was now being put to the test by a writer who was capable of making use of all the liberties that biography had won."

Michael Holroyd has written acclaimed biographies of Ellen Terry and Henry Irving, Augustus John, George Bernard Shaw, and Lytton Strachey as well as two memoirs,  Basil Street Blues, and  Mosaic. Holroyd is the president emeritus of the Royal Society of Literature, knighted for his services to literature and the only nonfiction writer to have received the David Cohen British Prize for Literature. His book, A Strange Eventful History, won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for biography in 2009. He lives in London with his wife, the novelist Margaret Drabble.

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ALEX A KERR
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Elegant writing
Reviewed in the United States on November 16, 2020
Lytton Strachey is an amusing, arch, and eloquent writer. In one sentence he will string together a series of effusive Victorian adjectives, suddenly to be concluded with a word that''s surprisingly modern, terse, daring, even breathtaking. He''s a classical writer who takes... See more
Lytton Strachey is an amusing, arch, and eloquent writer. In one sentence he will string together a series of effusive Victorian adjectives, suddenly to be concluded with a word that''s surprisingly modern, terse, daring, even breathtaking. He''s a classical writer who takes risks. Strachey''s writing can be sly, smilingly cynical, but he takes a deep interest in his subjects'' lives, and in the end brings home their deep human qualities.
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Charlene Vickers
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The importance of not being earnest
Reviewed in the United States on September 23, 2005
Some of Lytton Strachey''s choices of subject for the four scathing biographical essays contained in _Eminent Victorians_ may seem rather strange. Florence Nightingale was an obvious choice for any biographer, but who cared about Matthew Arnold in the post-war era when... See more
Some of Lytton Strachey''s choices of subject for the four scathing biographical essays contained in _Eminent Victorians_ may seem rather strange. Florence Nightingale was an obvious choice for any biographer, but who cared about Matthew Arnold in the post-war era when Strachey was writing these essays? Who gave a thought to Cardinal Manning or Chinese Gordon? And why combine their biographies into one book?

The answer may be that all four shared one unusual character trait, one so reminiscent of the Victorian age that even the thought of it brings the scent of lavender to mind: extreme earnestness. Each figure cared very, very deeply about something, but for each that earnestness also masked a corresponding personal craving. Like many young Britons in the post-WWI era, Strachey was deeply distrustful of earnestness, often seeing it as an excuse for personal gain or fulfillment. This was especially true when one man''s deeply held beliefs sent others to their deaths, as it often had during WWI. He had no time for official incompetence, ignorance, or inaction, but often found the opposite just as dangerous.

The first essay in _Eminent Victorians_ is that of Cardinal Manning. Manning was a priest in the Church of England who became involved in the Oxford Movement, a group of churchmen who disliked the increasing secularization of the C of E and who wished to bring it back to its Catholic roots. Most of those involved remained in the Anglican communion, forming the nucleus of the "High Church" movement of the late 19th century. Manning found that he could not stop at that, though; unable to reconcile his belief in a Church Universal with his membership in a church that existed basically because Henry VIII was a serial adulterer, and unable to ''take back'' the text of a tract he had written that was deeply critical of the Anglican church and which eliminated any chances of his gaining higher office, Manning found himself eventually in the arms of Rome. Strachey paints Manning as a weak, vacillating, impulsive man of great ambition whose conversion to Roman Catholicism was as much a political and career move as one of the heart and soul. Had Manning remained in the Church of England, Strachey implies, he would have been an archdeacon until death; only conversion to Roman Catholicism allowed him to fulfil his ambitions towards higher office. It''s a masterful biography, one that explores not just its purported subject but also the birth of Anglo-Catholicism.

The third essay, of Rugby school headmaster Matthew Arnold, reveals Strachey''s hatred of the English public school system (or what we in North America would call the private school system). He skewers Arnold for failing to make the educational reforms he was hired to make and for delegating the discipline of younger students to the senior class, thereby condoning and even encouraging the type of severe bullying that caused many young men to consider suicide. Arnold, whose earnestness in creating ''Christian gentlemen'' did not go so far as to allow him to teach them himself, refused to update the school curriculum ostensibly because gentlemen didn''t need science, maths, or English literature, but really (as Strachey contends) because Arnold had studied Latin and Greek himself and didn''t want to feel his own learning was unnecessary. Strachey points out that Arnold did little at Rugby except pronounce the Sunday sermon, intimidate students, and foster a personality cult that eventually made him the father of modern education in many Britons'' eyes - even though he made no changes to the educational system itself. His reforms in discipline and in religion (and his lack of reforms in curriculum) were copied by most public schools, to the great detriment of the British people.

In Strachey''s essay on General Gordon, Strachey shows how a brave man with a strong belief in the rightness of his cause and an overwhelming desire for adventure may have been used to precipitate a war and to advance the cause of imperialism. Gordon, a war veteran and former colonial administrator (and a rather unstable fellow), was sent to the Sudan during a revolt to report on conditions there and to evacuate civilians who were loyal to Egypt, which was then controlled by the British. Gordon did none of the above; he instead tried to wipe out the insurrection, and for his troubles was killed and his staff and allies massacred. His death was used by the imperialist factions in the ruling party as a call to arms. Strachey wonders: was this deliberate? Was Gordon given alternate instructions by the imperialists? Did they intend for him to die, so that his death could be used as a rallying point for further imperialism? He argues his point well, and the essay is definitely worth reading.

Strachey''s portrait of Florence Nightingale is not quite as successful as the rest. Nightingale was born into a wealthy family, and like all young women of her class and time was expected to marry young, have children, and generally be nothing more than a society lady. Florence wanted more: she wanted to work, to make a difference, to change the world, and she wanted everybody around her to work as hard as she did. After many years of waiting, she finally had her chance; her efforts to reform British military hospitals and eventually the practice of medicine in the Empire did in fact change the world. Strachey seems to have thought that she pushed her colleagues too hard, that her own drive was so abnormal that her friends and family could not keep up. Granted, she did push some of her colleagues very hard, and one may have even died from overwork, but they chose to work with her because they believed in her, and given what she was able to do I think they were right to believe in her. It also appears that Strachey may not have been comfortable with a woman refusing to hide her intelligence or personal strength when dealing with men. I had the distinct impression while reading this essay that Strachey was sneering at those men who took orders from Nightingale or who assisted her in her work. Another reviewer mentioned that Nightingale is portrayed here as a ''pushy woman'' - and she certainly is; however, most of Strachey''s implied criticism seems to be directed towards the men who treated her as the intelligent, hard-working, valuable human being she was. Strachey also seems to have viewed her invalid status as something of a neurotic problem, which in the light of recent research (showing that she likely had undulant fever) may not be accurate.
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Kenneth Hurry
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The first "modern biographer"
Reviewed in the United States on December 11, 2018
The four essays are easy to read. Strachey basically imitates Gibbon''s style, although he disclaims it. Unlike current biography, there is clearly much that cannot be stated - as being unacceptable to the then-contemporary reader - and has to be hinted at, creating a rather... See more
The four essays are easy to read. Strachey basically imitates Gibbon''s style, although he disclaims it. Unlike current biography, there is clearly much that cannot be stated - as being unacceptable to the then-contemporary reader - and has to be hinted at, creating a rather feline atmosphere. Some minor figures border on caricature: politicians, Pius IX, but Strachey provides many fascinating details of 19th century background to his chosen subjects, probably unknown to the modern reader.
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Steven Farron
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Excellent biographies; flawed commentary
Reviewed in the United States on September 13, 2009
John Sutherland''s full commentary remedies the one defect - carelessness with factual detail - that mars Strachey''s fascinating and informative biographies of four eminent Victorians. However, Sutherland himself, like all other commentators I have read, has a serious fault,... See more
John Sutherland''s full commentary remedies the one defect - carelessness with factual detail - that mars Strachey''s fascinating and informative biographies of four eminent Victorians. However, Sutherland himself, like all other commentators I have read, has a serious fault, which could distort readers'' understanding of what Strachey was doing. He assumes that Strachey "spectacularly subverted the certainties on which the Victorian age was founded" (page viii); that he "portrayed" "all four" as "neurotics"; was "examining the dark and dirty labyrinth of Victorian unconsciousness" (page xi); that he "spatters" "ridicule" on his subjects (Page xii); or, as the blurb on the back cover alleges, "Debunking Church, Public School, and Empire ..."
Strachey says in his preface that his biographies differ from "[t]hose fat two volumes ... with their tone of tedious panegyric." Anyone who has read Monypenny and Buckle''s SIX volume biography of Disraeli, which goes out of its way to attribute to Disraeli every imaginable virtue (e.g., he loved children), knows what Strachey means.
However, if the reader ignores the allegations of generations of commentators and looks at what Strachey wrote without preconception, he will see that he admired all four of his subjects and meant for his readers to admire them. "[A] perfect English gentleman" is the way Strachey describes Sydney Herbert (page 121), and Strachey''s description of him in that paragraph and the following pages shows that he meant that as the highest praise. Strachey even treats with impartiality and often empathy the aspect of Victorian life that by the time he was writing must have already seemed strange: the centrality of "old time religion" in the thought and lives of educated Victorians. (From the inception of printing through the year 1900, more books were published in the United Kingdom on religion than on all other subjects combined.)
Different as Strachey''s subjects are from each other, they have one thing in common. All were rebels. Manning deserted the Church of England, one of the central pillars of the Victorian establishment. Nightingale defied the expectations of the way an upper-class woman should lead her life to challenge relentlessly and adamantly the British army and radically reform the nursing profession and army hospitals. Arnold radically reformed another bastion of the establishment: the public (i.e., private) schools. Gordon was an eccentric loner, who followed the opposite policy from the one he was sent to Khartoum to implement.
Nevertheless, all were greatly admired by those whom they led or cared for: Manning by British Catholics, Nightingale by the soldiers under her supervision, Arnold by his students (page 165), and Gordon by the people of the Sudan (page 208). More strikingly, these rebels, radicals, and eccentrics were heroes of British society; they were "eminent Victorians" in their own time. This fact must force the reader to re-assess one of the most prevalent stereotypes about the Victorians: their supposed insistence on conventionality and conformity.
In fact, Strachey achieved what Collingwood stated was the goal of history in his classic study The Idea of History (pages 231-49). He reconstructed a plausible and coherent account of what his four subjects (and several of the people with whom they interacted) were like, what motivated them, what "made them tick." It must be added (and this also fulfilled Collingwood''s requirement) that Strachey''s account is not plausible of human beings in general. Rather, it is historically plausible; it is plausible considering the specific time and place in which his subjects lived; and by providing it, Strachey illuminated important aspects of Victorian life and thought.
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Shaner
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Why did Lady Edith mention this on Downton Abbey?
Reviewed in the United States on August 26, 2021
Because he was one of the best writers of the earlier 20th century. Biographies are short, and a delight to read. Catholic readers may be interested in his chapter devoted to 2 contemporary converts from the Anglican to Roman Catholic faith: Cardinals Manning and Newman.... See more
Because he was one of the best writers of the earlier 20th century. Biographies are short, and a delight to read. Catholic readers may be interested in his chapter devoted to 2 contemporary converts from the Anglican to Roman Catholic faith: Cardinals Manning and Newman. All I''ll say is it''s fascinating (no spoilers from me!).
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Thomas M. Sullivan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Delight in Any Age
Reviewed in the United States on September 7, 2016
Never having slaked my interest in Victorian England by reading innumerable titles on the period (note: if you share my happy obsession, immediately Amazon yourself a copy of Judith Flanders’ “Inside the Victorian Home”; you’ll love it), I resolved again and again to... See more
Never having slaked my interest in Victorian England by reading innumerable titles on the period (note: if you share my happy obsession, immediately Amazon yourself a copy of Judith Flanders’ “Inside the Victorian Home”; you’ll love it), I resolved again and again to finally get around to “Eminent Victorians” but never did. Never did, that is, until viewing for the second or third time the movie “Carrington,” starring the inimitable Emma Thompson as Dora Carrington and Jonathan Pryce as Strachey. The movie tells the story of the couple’s fascinating relationship which lasted many years despite the fact that any fair-minded observer would have found it baffling.

In any event, the movie demonstrates just what a blockbuster this book was when it was published in 1918. It took Britain by storm and made Strachey a ballyhooed celebrity, however constitutionally unsuited he was for the part. And having read it, one understands why. Strachey was a wordsmith of inestimable talent who masterfully relates the life stories of four Victorian superstars (only two of whom, Florence Nightingale and General Gordon are familiar to us today) with a flashing wit and unfailing insightfulness that lets the reader delight in guessing whether at any particular moment he’s praising or condemning his subject. Relentlessly sardonic, but seldom sarcastic, his portraits are the very models of damning with faint praise.

So, whether you are a fan of the period or not, you owe it to yourself to read “Eminent Victorians.” Its popularity has endured for nearly a century because it’s not a book relevant only to a particular slice of history, but for all literary time.
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Kindle Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good essays
Reviewed in the United States on July 19, 2015
Well documented essays on an interesting historical time.
Particularly interesting, for me, were those on Gordon Pasha and Florence nightingale.
A minus is the pedantic and heavy prose that makes reading somewhat unconfortable.
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John S.
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not this edition!
Reviewed in the United States on April 22, 2016
I found the endnotes far more annoying than useful - definitely should be footnotes instead!
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Top reviews from other countries

Stephen Bentley
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Elegant demolition of Victorian legends
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 25, 2020
Written in the aftermath of WW1 these are masterly essays on Cardinal Manning, General Gordon, Florence Nightingale and Dr Arnold. The only person, as distinct from popular legend, that comes out enhanced is Florence Nightingale. He very effectively and succinctly blows up...See more
Written in the aftermath of WW1 these are masterly essays on Cardinal Manning, General Gordon, Florence Nightingale and Dr Arnold. The only person, as distinct from popular legend, that comes out enhanced is Florence Nightingale. He very effectively and succinctly blows up the whole Lady of the Lamp twaddle and gives proper recognition to her pioneering work on general public health and hygiene. Cardinal Manning emerges as a creepy vicious old fraud, Dr Arnold and the whole doctrine of "muscular christianity" that bedevilled British education and society for nearly 100 years ,and could in part be held responsible for WW1, is denounced as a rampant hypocrite. General Gordon, oddly, is sympathized with but as a victim of the whole "white man''s burden" crap that sustained the British Empire. He takes what on the surface is a flippant, at times facetious tone. On reflection, the outrage and fury comes through loud and clear.
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Ian Brawn
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Biographies masquerading as history
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 19, 2013
Strachey states explicitly in his preface that this is history masquerading as biography. In practice, this means we don''t get fully-rounded biographies of the subjects, but sketches focused on particular aspects of their lives: the Oxford movement, Scutari, Rugby and...See more
Strachey states explicitly in his preface that this is history masquerading as biography. In practice, this means we don''t get fully-rounded biographies of the subjects, but sketches focused on particular aspects of their lives: the Oxford movement, Scutari, Rugby and Khartoum. This is not necessarily a bad thing. We don''t have to read through endless correspondence, for example. Cardinal Manning is first up. Religion is a constant theme in the book and Manning emerges as the least pious of its subjects. As described, he was ambitious, mean spirited and concerned with all the wrong aspects of religion: dogmatic, theological abstraction rather than charity, etc.. There may be a selection bias at work here: Manning''s social work is mentioned briefly, but Strachey is more interested in Manning''s faults than his strengths. And let''s be honest, who isn''t? Florence nightingale is next. Strachey starts by warning us that she was less agreeable than her legend suggests. However, compared to modern biographies this is mild stuff. She was head-strong and possibly neurotic; when weighed against her achievements these are very minor faults, and after reading this biography she went up in my estimation greatly. The villains of this piece are the purblind members of the establishment, against whom she battled. They are subject to the full force of Strachey''s gentle sarcasm. Thomas Arnold is portrayed as the father of the modern public school system. Like Nightingale, he combined piety with practicality, though with results of less certain value. To modern eyes his methods appear unorthodox, his deprecation of scientific knowledge looks bizarre, but his focus on moral education is refreshing. I suspect Strachey, writing in the aftermath of the First World War, found even this questionable. Despite being titled The End of General Gordon, the last section offers perhaps the fullest biography. This is fortunate, as Charles Gordon was a fascinating character: brilliant, mercurial and eccentric. There is also a stronger narrative drive to this section as we know where Gordon was heading: to a bad end in the heat of the Sudan. Ultimately the tale that emerges is of an incoherent, duplicitous government that exploits Gordon as much for his weaknesses as for his strengths. George MacDonald Fraser once wrote "You cannot, you must not, judge the past by the present; you must try to see it in its own terms and values, if you are to have any inkling of it." Well, Strachey isn''t much interested in that. With his uniform tone of dry wit and his gentle digs he frequently invites us to judge events on our terms. He was writing in a period much closer to the Victorian age than we are to his, to correct a popular image that we no longer possess. As a result, the composite picture that emerges tells us as much about Strachey''s age as it does the Victorian''s. Does this matter? Not much. Despite Strachey''s aims, this book is best appreciated as a collection of biographies: four breezy accounts of four remarkable individuals.
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Rowan Parker
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A Classic
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 21, 2011
A classic of its time. The witty Lytton Strachey unseats Victorian icons from their pedestals. I most enjoyed the chapter on Cardinal Manning, which touches on the life and work of John Henry Newman and the Oxford Movement as well as the English Catholic church at a...See more
A classic of its time. The witty Lytton Strachey unseats Victorian icons from their pedestals. I most enjoyed the chapter on Cardinal Manning, which touches on the life and work of John Henry Newman and the Oxford Movement as well as the English Catholic church at a turbulent time in its history. Over-reliant on secondary sources, I understand, but a real page-turner.
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Amazon Customer
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bit dated
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 22, 2019
okay
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Bill Larkworthy
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In general I don''t like prefaces and this one was verbose and tedious
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 21, 2018
In general I don''t like prefaces and this one was verbose and tedious, otherwise an interesting read but I could have done without the Greek and Latin quotations
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