2021 new arrival The high quality Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get online sale Inside Our Heads online sale

2021 new arrival The high quality Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get online sale Inside Our Heads online sale

2021 new arrival The high quality Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get online sale Inside Our Heads online sale

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From the author of the award-winning The Master Switch, who coined the term "net neutrality”—a revelatory, ambitious and urgent account of how the capture and re-sale of human attention became the defining industry of our time. 

One of the Best Books of the Year
The San Francisco Chronicle * The Philadelphia Inquirer * Vox * The Globe and Mail (Toronto)


Ours is often called an information economy, but at a moment when access to information is virtually unlimited, our attention has become the ultimate commodity. In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of efforts to harvest our attention. This condition is not simply the byproduct of recent technological innovations but the result of more than a century''s growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention.

Wu’s narrative begins in the nineteenth century, when Benjamin Day discovered he could get rich selling newspapers for a penny. Since then, every new medium—from radio to television to Internet companies such as Google and Facebook—has attained commercial viability and immense riches by turning itself into an advertising platform. Since the early days, the basic business model of “attention merchants” has never changed: free diversion in exchange for a moment of your time, sold in turn to the highest-bidding advertiser.

Full of lively, unexpected storytelling and piercing insight, The Attention Merchants lays bare the true nature of a ubiquitous reality we can no longer afford to accept at face value.

Review

“Vigorous, entertaining. . . . Wu describes how the rise of electronic media established human attention as perhaps the world’s most valuable commodity.” The Boston Globe

“The Attention Merchants is a book of our time, touching on an emerging strain of anxiety about the information age. . . . A bracing intellectual tour de force.” The San Francisco Chronicle


“Comprehensive and conscientious, readers are bound to stumble on ideas and episodes of media history that they knew little about. [Wu] writes with elegance and clarity, giving readers the pleasing sensation of walking into a stupendously well-organized closet.” The New York Times 
 
“A startling and sweeping examination of the increasingly ubiquitous commercial effort to capture and commodify our attention. . . . We’ve become the consumers, the producers, and the content. We are selling ourselves to ourselves.” The New Republic
 
“The book is studded with sharp illustrations of those who have tried to stop the encroachment of advertising on our lives, and usually failed. . . . Wu dramatizes this push and pull to great effect.” The New York Times Book Review

“An engaging history of the attention economy. . . . [Wu] wants to show us how our current conditions arose.” The Washington Post
 
“Dazzling. . . . [Wu] could hardly have chosen a better time to publish a history of attention-grabbing. . . . He traces a sustained march of marketers further into our lives.” The Financial Times
 
“ [An] erudite, energizing, outraging, funny and thorough history of one of humanity''s core undertakings—getting other people to care about stuff that matters to you.” Boing Boing
 
“Engaging and informative. . . . [Wu’s] account . . . is a must-read.” The Washington Times

About the Author

Tim Wu is a policy advocate and professor at Columbia Law School. In 2006, Scientific American named him one of fifty leaders in science and technology; in 2013, National Law Journal included him among “America’s 100 Most Influential Lawyers”; and in 2014 and 2015, he was named to the “Politico 50.” He won the Lowell Thomas Gold medal for travel journalism and is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times.
 
http://www.timwu.org

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4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
377 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Mickey P.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good book, but spends a majority of it''s time on pre-internet advertising.
Reviewed in the United States on January 25, 2018
A good history on advertising, and well written. However, a majority of the content is on the 19th century and first 3 quarters of the 20th.The content on modern advertising (google, facebook, etc) is comparatively short and lacking exhibits. Isn''t this why we bought the... See more
A good history on advertising, and well written. However, a majority of the content is on the 19th century and first 3 quarters of the 20th.The content on modern advertising (google, facebook, etc) is comparatively short and lacking exhibits. Isn''t this why we bought the book, for insights into digital attention harvesting? This reader was left wanting for more examples and greater depth.

Still contains valuable insight, and an entertaining read.
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Mal Warwick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The colorful story of advertising, well told
Reviewed in the United States on November 29, 2016
If you’ve been paying attention, you can’t have missed the changes in the character of advertising over the course of your life. Certainly, I have. Chances are, you were born in the age of radio, at the earliest. If so, you’ve witnessed a string of new technologies enter... See more
If you’ve been paying attention, you can’t have missed the changes in the character of advertising over the course of your life. Certainly, I have. Chances are, you were born in the age of radio, at the earliest. If so, you’ve witnessed a string of new technologies enter the realm of news and entertainment, almost always paired with aggressive advertising sooner or later: network television, cable TV, the personal computer, the Internet, and the smartphone.

In his insightful history of the business of advertising, Columbia University law professor Tim Wu casts a wider net. Beginning with the advent of the penny press in the 1830s, he explores in telling detail the now centuries-long battle between the commercial interests who want to seize our attention for their own ends and the individuals who want to keep our lives private and access news, information, and entertainment without distraction. This is a colorful story, and Wu tells it well.

Though Wu opens with the introduction of the Sun in New York in 1833, his history more properly begins much later in the 19th century with the emergence of the advertising industry to sell Snake Oil and other patent medicines. (Yes, Snake Oil Liniment was actually a widely sold product Good for Man and Beast.) “From the 1890s thr0ugh the 1920s,” he writes, “there arose the first means for harvesting attention on a mass scale and directing it for commercial effect . . . [A]dvertising was the conversion engine that, with astonishing efficiency, turned the cash crop of attention into an industrial commodity.”

The penny press, Amos ‘n Andy, and pop-up ads

Beginning in the early years of the 20th century, Wu frames his story around the development of radio and the four “screens” that have dominated our attention over the decades that followed: the “silver” screen (film), television, the personal computer, and the smartphone. The author relates the history of each of these technologies as a human story, describing the often outrageous personalities who pioneered and dominated each of these media in turn. However, in focusing on radio and the four screens, Wu overlooks the billboards that mar every urban line of sight and barely mentions the direct mail that floods our mailboxes. Though less than comprehensive, his historical account is engrossing and enlightening.

Here you’ll learn about the development of propaganda by the British government in World War I and its perfection by Nazi Germany . . . the first radio serial that was a smash hit (the grossly racist “Amos ‘n Andy“) in the 1920s . . . the invention of the soap opera in the 1930s . . . the battle between the networks on radio and later on TV from the 1930s through the 1990s . . . the development of geodemographic targeting for ads in the 1970s . . . the emergence of celebrity culture in the 1980s and its perversion by reality television in the 2000s . . . the wild proliferation of blogging in the 2000s . . . the identity theft committed by Google and Facebook in the 2000s and beyond . . . and, finally, “unplugging” and the emergence of free online streaming services like Netflix in the 2010s. This is not a pretty story.

A harsh judgment

The author is not a fan of the “new media” that have come to hold our attention in recent years. “The idealists had hoped the web would be different,” he notes, “and it certainly was for a time, but over the long term it would become something of a 99-cent store, if not an outright cesspool.” Similarly, Wu’s judgment about the advertising industry is harsh. “[U]nder competition, the race will naturally run to the bottom; attention will almost invariably gravitate to the more garish, lurid, outrageous alternative . . .” It’s difficult to find fault with any of this.

About the author

He’s the man who coined the term “network neutrality.” A specialist in media and technology, Tim Wu has written several books and numerous articles, all nonfiction. His work has influenced the development of national media policy under the Obama Administration.
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Read
Reviewed in the United States on December 22, 2016
Writing histories of soft power – advertising, entertainment, persuasion, etc – has its difficulties. The historians of the hard variety of power can attach their arguments to a battle won, a piece of legislation passed, an election lost, something concrete where impact... See more
Writing histories of soft power – advertising, entertainment, persuasion, etc – has its difficulties. The historians of the hard variety of power can attach their arguments to a battle won, a piece of legislation passed, an election lost, something concrete where impact and significance seem clearer, more obvious. Yet the exercise of soft power is both commonplace and important because it often does shape our lives in a myriad of ways. But how do you prove such claims?

Well Tim Wu has done a masterful job of tracking the story of a changing group of people, mostly men, who have sort to harvest the attention of publics and then sell that attention to a bevy of clients, mostly advertisers of one kind or another. The overall story isn’t new: there have been many fine histories of advertising over the years, and of its effect on culture and consumers. But Wu adds to the chronicle by focusing much of his argument on the modern incarnation of the attention merchants, no longer just newspaper publishers or admen or broadcast moguls but the ones who run the massively popular websites, say a Mark Zuckerberg, that wins our attention by offering an appealing service, a lot of supposedly ‘free stuff.’ Except of course it isn’t quite free, or rather it produces a saleable product, our eyes, that can generate huge profits. And the success of such enterprise shapes the whole character of the internet, just like the fact of advertising shaped first newspapers, then radio, and finally television news and entertainment.

It’s the details of the story that especially intrigue. Thus I was taken by his bio of someone he calls the alchemist, Claude Hopkins, an adman early in the 20th century, whose successes and views had a major impact on the course of marketing throughout the next few decades. Wu has obviously done much research and thought hard about his findings. He writes well, very well indeed: the story flows easily, the arguments are clear, and his claims are always interesting, even if you might doubt his conclusions. So his suggestion a consumer revolt is brewing nowadays I liked, and hope he’s correct, but I doubt – there have been too many such claims in times past but we still live in marketing’s moment. Things change yes, styles of persuasion get updated, but the rule of the persuader persists: so the political consultant may have suffered some hard times in the past election cycle (because so many expensive campaigns failed abysmally), but the triumph of Trump (who doesn’t figure in the book) shows the huckster remains a potent figure in the American mix.

The characters I found most intriguing here, like Hopkins, weren’t just selling our attention but manufacturing attraction, making products or people or causes appealing to the various markets and publics. Because in part our attention to the free stuff doesn’t mean our submission to the wishes of the elites. There’s another step, namely the crafting of the brand or the cause, making something that captivates or, apparently, fills a need. In short the real exercise of soft power came through the efforts of the adman, although now more the ad-maker and public relations counsel, what’s been called the persuasion industry. Sometimes I had the feeling Wu’s approach emphasized attention too much, attraction too little.

But the real point is that Wu’s book provokes thought about a brand of soft power that is both ubiquitous and compelling. The only answer, unfortunately inadequate I think, is to get off the grid – don’t Facebook, don’t tweet, don’t watch television, then you can’t be sold. Except, of course, you then miss out on the free stuff.
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Mr. D. Sullivan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
YOU''LL NEVER BELIEVE WHAT THIS BOOK DID TO MY CAT!!! (and other tricks of the attention merchants)
Reviewed in the United States on April 15, 2018
I loved this book, despite it infecting my mind with the catchy coke song from the 1970s. I will be endlessly singing about growing "apple trees and honey bees and snow-white turtle doves," much to my cat''s dismay. Wu takes us on a steadfast march through... See more
I loved this book, despite it infecting my mind with the catchy coke song from the 1970s. I will be endlessly singing about growing "apple trees and honey bees and snow-white turtle doves," much to my cat''s dismay.

Wu takes us on a steadfast march through history, as advertisers and propagandists become increasingly adept at capturing our attention. In examining this progression, Wu reminds us why we must reclaim our attention in this modern era of intense media saturation. Otherwise, we may drown in a series of choices not wholly our own.

What''s most surprising about the attention merchants is how calculating they are. Nothing is random--every attention merchant tries to quantify the best method of triggering an automated response in the human psyche. Buzzfeed headlines are not happenstance. They come out of Jonah Peretti''s time at MIT and his attempts to understand the formula for "going viral." The coupon I received the other day for a free 12-pack of reformulated Diet Pepsi dates back to the days of patent-medicine advertising, although Pepsi made no faux healing claims. Someone already did the math--x number of coupons in x area will result in an increase in x percent of sales. This gets much scarier when we consider the that marketers are actively harvesting the attention of children and that governments are harvesting the attention of future soldiers--and that propagandists can make our choices seem involuntary.

I was especially intrigued by the revolts that come when the attention merchants go too far. Ad blockers. Ad-free subscription models. We see these happen on a huge scale. However, mini-revolts happen locally, too. When I was a kid, McDonalds offered to pay for a new sign for a local high school in return for placing its iconic glowing arches on top of the display. The sign went up in the fall, with the arches on top, glowing 24/7. When the grass grew in on the school''s football field in the spring, weed killer had been used to spell out FOOD, FOLKS, AND FUN, in giant letters--easily visible by helicopter. The golden arches above the sign came down soon after.

Recently, Facebook signed a deal with MLB to stream 25 baseball games. Why? According to Wu''s book, sports fans are loyal, enduring audiences. Social media users are less reliable givers of their attention. Facebook might very well be trying to stem a revolt or survive what will almost certainly be an eventual fleeing user base--perhaps facebook already sees cracks in its foundation. Perhaps Zuckerberg read Wu''s book.

Overall, this book is a history lesson on how the attention merchants have evolved, and from that history, we can start to extrapolate certain truths, including that we must be careful where our attention is focused. We must be more aware, more savvy. Wu notes:

“As William James observed, we must reflect that, when we reach the end of our days, our life experience will equal what we have paid attention to, whether by choice or default. We are at risk, without quite fully realizing it, of living lives that are less our own than we imagine.”

If you want to improve at making your life your own, at savoring your scarce time, then read this book. It''s very much worth your attention.
3 people found this helpful
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WU.
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not bad. Not great.
Reviewed in the United States on February 8, 2019
This one fell a bit short of my expectations. The first part of the book which is meant to serve as a sort of "Book of Genesis" for the attention-harvesting industry was done much better in Captains of Consciousness: Advertising And The Social Roots Of The... See more
This one fell a bit short of my expectations.

The first part of the book which is meant to serve as a sort of "Book of Genesis" for the attention-harvesting industry was done much better in Captains of Consciousness: Advertising And The Social Roots Of The Consumer Culture, by Stuart Ewen. It''s not that the author''s effort here is necessarily bad, but at times it comes off a bit dry and unfocused, often providing obsequious details in exchange for clarity and sound analysis.

The second half of the book dealing with the internet, facebook, google, twitter, insta, etc. was, if nothing else, a tad rushed.

Furthermore, the whole thing strikes me as disjointed, more like a collection of various magazine pieces with the flimsiest of threads connecting them. It reads like equal parts Wall Street Journal and Wikipedia page; I want a concise narrative not a curated collection of articles.

Ultimately, I was expecting better social commentary from the author as well, which when it did arrive was a bit trite.

So, If you have been following popular culture trends for a while and occasionally reading about them as a study/reflection of the modern human condition, you''ll hardly find anything new here.

However, if this is your first foray into the subject, you might find it more informative and entertaining, and not a bad choice either.
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Andrew Montalenti
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good history of the advertising industry, rethought as the reaping and sowing of human attention through the ages
Reviewed in the United States on July 18, 2017
This was an excellent history of the advertising industry, with lots of thought-provoking historical analogs and anecdotes. It''s a good follow-up to Tim Wu''s earlier book, The Master Switch, that focuses on technology monopolies. The basic thrust of the book is that ever... See more
This was an excellent history of the advertising industry, with lots of thought-provoking historical analogs and anecdotes. It''s a good follow-up to Tim Wu''s earlier book, The Master Switch, that focuses on technology monopolies. The basic thrust of the book is that ever since the days of the earliest printing presses, there was a realization that the real money to be made from content was around harvesting "user attention". Through the 1800s and 1900s, the exact mechanisms used to harvest attention (newspapers, magazines, radio stations, television stations, and, eventually, the Internet) may have changed, the industry was always driven by the lucrative delivery of some percentage of some audience''s time for commercial messages. The end of the book is, predictably, where the anecdotes become weaker and less interesting, as we transition to discussions of attention harvest and sale at companies like BuzzFeed and Facebook which are all very well covered by the popular press, at this point. But luckily the meat of the book is the (lesser known) history, and that''s the portion I found most fascinating.
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Richard Wellman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you are not buying a product then your attention is the product
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2017
The Attention Merchants is a grand tour of the history of current advertising landscape. If you can get people to pay attention, you have a valuable asset that can be monetized via advertising. Newspapers and magazines are primarily supported by ad revenue. Since they... See more
The Attention Merchants is a grand tour of the history of current advertising landscape. If you can get people to pay attention, you have a valuable asset that can be monetized via advertising. Newspapers and magazines are primarily supported by ad revenue. Since they need attention to survive, the result is a race to the bottom for the most outlandish stories.

I found it surprising how very deep advertising has influenced our belief systems as a society. Even going to war has to be advertised and sold. Tim explains this process very well. I can personally attest to the effectiveness of that particular ad campaign. I joined the Navy to see the world because it was not just a job but an adventure.

The power of the attention merchants shouldn’t be underestimated. Facebook and Google have created a monopoly for our attention and have been selling that attention to the highest bidder. This has huge consequences for our republic. The Russians purchasing ads on Facebook to influence our past election is a great example of what is now possible with the attention merchants.

This is a great book to fully understand our current media landscape and where it might go next.
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Jerry Woolpy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Your concentration is in trouble
Reviewed in the United States on February 13, 2017
Review of The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu written by Jerry Woolpy What our founders derived from the Age of Enlightenment was freedom to depart from the dogmatism of religious faith, to be rational, individual, and not subject to the authority of a king. What we got... See more
Review of The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu written by Jerry Woolpy
What our founders derived from the Age of Enlightenment was freedom to depart from the dogmatism of religious faith, to be rational, individual, and not subject to the authority of a king. What we got was society consumed with agents competing for our attention. At first it was snake oil salesmen, then candidates, and eventually entertainment paid for to persuade on behalf of a product or service. Radio, television, internet, smart phones attracted us and eventually made our habits into products to be marketed. As technology made delivery ever more efficient our concentration was compromised. Our time to think, dream, and create was challenged. Our news was driven by drama. We elect people with the loudest voices without consideration of what they are saying. But there is hope. At the theater and in our sanctuaries we turn off our phones. We have ad blockers for the internet and recorders like Tivo to bypass commercial interruption and allow us to view programs at leisure. We have public radio and television relatively free of the incessant commercials that the Attention Merchants are bent upon. The book is an exposé of the sale of our attention. Will our awareness protect us? We will reclaim our minds? Is the election of Donald Trump going to lead to an epiphany of the freedom our forefathers envisioned for us?
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Top reviews from other countries

Jon A. Crowcroft
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
pays attention! this important is...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 27, 2018
this is a great read - traces the business of advertising back 100 years before internet, tv, radio to early print - news papers sold below cost, ended up peppering their front page with loads of annoying content - fast forwrd through same thing on radio, then TV (see Jerry...See more
this is a great read - traces the business of advertising back 100 years before internet, tv, radio to early print - news papers sold below cost, ended up peppering their front page with loads of annoying content - fast forwrd through same thing on radio, then TV (see Jerry Mander''s 4 arguments for the elimination of TV for that too), to the intenret )see Shoshanna Zuboff''s Suveillenace Capitalism for another take on this - also Jaron Lanier''s works - prefer you are not a gadget, but 10 arguments for leaving social media also good) - this book analyses the background economics, reasons for the intrusion and mechanisms used to grab your eyeball time - essential reading (and a good way to avoid those google, facebook, tv adverts too:)
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A. Crofts
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A book worth donating several hours of your life to.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 12, 2017
I loved this book. Extremely accessible and easy to read, it demonstrates over and over again how clever big business is at harvesting our time as well as our money. I devoted several hours from whatever time I have left on this earth to read it and do not begrudge...See more
I loved this book. Extremely accessible and easy to read, it demonstrates over and over again how clever big business is at harvesting our time as well as our money. I devoted several hours from whatever time I have left on this earth to read it and do not begrudge Professor Wu a single second of it.
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Jennifer Smith
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Promises more than delivers
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 27, 2018
If you are completely unaware of the function, historically, of traditional media seeking to capture attention to sell for advertising, and it’s contempory form through social media, this is likely to be an interesting read. If you have heard of social media and are know...See more
If you are completely unaware of the function, historically, of traditional media seeking to capture attention to sell for advertising, and it’s contempory form through social media, this is likely to be an interesting read. If you have heard of social media and are know some information about its development over recent years, it is a remarkably tedious and empty experience. It feels like a well written historical piece that has been overpromised and mistakenly promoted by the publisher, with no offence to the author who is clearly extremely knowledgeable and very articulate.
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Mr. K. M. Patel
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very enlightening
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 26, 2018
Really interesting take on how some of the structures in society came about, and as I''ve heard many times in my life, follow the money. This book has definitely made me more conscious of the attempts to grab my attention. Would recommend to those who struggle with finding...See more
Really interesting take on how some of the structures in society came about, and as I''ve heard many times in my life, follow the money. This book has definitely made me more conscious of the attempts to grab my attention. Would recommend to those who struggle with finding time for the things they''ve always wanted to, although this isn''t a self help book it definitely makes you think about how you end up wasting your time.
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E L R
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
May I please have your attention?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 27, 2018
A history of the attention industry. It''s shocking. This book contextualises the current internet/smart phone attention grab as merely the last in a long line of technologies used by commercial forces to capture and resell your attention. Together with Adler''s Irresistible,...See more
A history of the attention industry. It''s shocking. This book contextualises the current internet/smart phone attention grab as merely the last in a long line of technologies used by commercial forces to capture and resell your attention. Together with Adler''s Irresistible, and Carr''s The Shallows, this is in my view essential reading to anyone that uses modern media technology.
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2021 new arrival The high quality Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get online sale Inside Our Heads online sale

2021 new arrival The high quality Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get online sale Inside Our Heads online sale

2021 new arrival The high quality Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get online sale Inside Our Heads online sale

2021 new arrival The high quality Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get online sale Inside Our Heads online sale

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